Virginia Memory, Library of Virginia
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THIS DAY IN VIRGINIA HISTORY

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March 07, 1863

Letter of Application from E. W. White, 7 March 1863, Manuscript, Applications of Ladies for Clerkships on Virginia Treasury Notes, 1861–1864, Auditor of Public Accounts, Administration of State Government: Public Debt-Treasury Notes, Entry 324, Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia Letter of Application from E. W. White, 7 March 1863, Manuscript, Applications of Ladies for Clerkships on Virginia Treasury Notes, 1861–1864, Auditor of Public Accounts, Administration of State Government: Public Debt-Treasury Notes, Entry 324, Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia

Elizabeth White Requested a Job at the State Treasury

Despite the hardships of the Civil War, an increased demand for clerical work and a shortage of men drew women into public employment for the first time. The Virginia General Assembly enacted a law authorizing the state treasurer to hire individuals to sign, number, and cut Virginia currency. An applicant's letter stated that the work was to be done by women, and many seized the chance for regular employment. Elizabeth White was a refugee from Texas living in Richmond and teaching music lessons, a job she did not enjoy.