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Folder 017 - "Maphis, Charles G., 1911-1919", Item 052

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oring to make plain; I. That it was all important to press the College measure at this time. II. That it was the part of wisdom and statesmanship for the University to lead. III. That we were unwilling to proceed under old conditions.

The idea of the assumption of leadership on the part of the University was really Dr. Alderman's own idea, and suggested to me by him at the close of the last Legislature. Dr. Alderman is mistaken in thinking that I felt the measure would be doomed to failure "because of my leadership," or that this was Mr. Moore's opinion. What I did say was, that I thought there was grave danger in our ability to pass the bill in war times unless we had leadership from the University and thoroughly hearted and aggressive support from Dr. Alderman and a Committee appointed by him. I also said that I thought the same type of support should come from Charlottesville itself, and that above all our Committee should not be put in the position of apparently hammering at the gates of our State University to induce it, in spite of itself, to extend its facilities, during war time, to the women of the State. I said I was unwilling to conduct a fight under such circumstance, and therefore, asked that the University assume leadership. If, however, for the University to introduce the bill means further action by the Board of Visitors, and Dr. Alderman does not believe he can secure this action, then if it is the sense of the three Committees in session here next week, that we go forward, Miss McKenney and I will agree to do our part, provided we have, just as you state, "an immediate and firm resolve by the University Committee to support as vigorously as possible to measure," such support to be well thought out and consistently pushed from this time on.

I do not altogether agree with you in your judgment as to the type of bill that we should present. I think the bill should be drawn as a war measure, asking for an annual income, say from twenty to twenty-five thousand dollars and offering to open in rented quarters in Charlottesville promptly in order to meet as quickly as possible the necessity for training our women, the site to be provided without cost to the state on land, either now owned or to be donated for that purpose, the choice of site to be left to the Board of Visitors. No appropriation for buildings or an increase of the annual stipend, as set forth above, to be made by the state until at least $150,000.00 should be raised by the friends of the College, a portion of which fund should be dedicated to scholarship for high school graduates returning to teach in the high schools.

I do not believe there will be any difficulty in preparing the bill satisfactorily to all concerned. I think that