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-2- to put up curtains in all their huts. About a week ago some of the older girls were allowed to give their first entertainment for the enlisted men. Fifty girls were selected and from each one a pledge was obtained to accept no offers to be escorted home, but to stay in the building until after every man had left. Seventy-five soldiers were invited. One hundred and twenty came. There was singing and piano playing and the men could not be persuaded to leave before eleven o'clock. Forty-nine girls kept to their promise. One started off down the front stoop with a soldier's arm around her waist. Another stepped up to her quietly and, slipping her arm through her elbow, said, "Remember our promise to the Y.W.C.A." The first girl rebelled, but her friend kept her arm locked securely and soon succeeded in taking her back into the building. Who can help a girl like another girl? The weaker had won a "big sister." Who can count the power of the friendliness of locked arms? Camp Lee is some miles from Petersburg, is built in the shape of a horseshoe, over seven miles from end to end. In the center of the horseshoe stand the general's headquarters, and directly opposite, our hostess house. We walked over the rafters, and longed for its completion. To us it seemed enormous, - 148 feet long. Colonel Hunt said it would be far too small and hoped it could be quadrupled at a moment's notice! He and other officers expressed enthusiasm and appreciation for the services they foresaw the house would render. We went through the Y.M.C.A. buildings and were told by one of the secretaries that from one building the previous Sunday 14,000 letters had been mailed. Miss Davis was asked to speak in one of the huts Sunday night. She told about our work to about 500 men who cheered and applauded and did not want to let her go home. Saturday morning we visited Camp Gordon. General Ely was most cordial. The men we met were impatient for the hostess house to be opened and said: 'how wonderful it would be." Everywhere they spoke also with enthusiasm and gratitude for the Y.M.C.A. Our Hostess House at Camp Gordon is 148 feet long and 112 wide, including long porches on two sides of the building. In Atlanta, the building contractors, instead of competing with each other, have combined an agreement to take contracts on the basis of a 10% profit. The government and Y.M.C.A. buildings have been put up on this basis and it was the only on which our hostess house could be erected. The average Y.M.C.A. hut is 112 by 38 feet and costs between $6,000 and $8,000. The auditorium, larger than the huts but considerably smaller than our hostess house, and with no partitions or second story, cost $13,000. Our hostess house, including heating plant, electric wiring, a number of partitions and a small second story containing six bed rooms and one bath room, and not including cafeteria equipment and furniture which will amount to about $5,000 will almost surely cost $16,000 and may cost $18,000. Before deciding on its final plans and specifications the question was considered whether the house would be used permanently or only temporarily. It is in a situation ideal for a