Virginia Memory, Library of Virginia
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Presidential Candidates

Union or Secession
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  • Extract from public announcement of Leonidas Baugh, a candidate for a vacant seat in the Virginia House of Delegates from Washington County. <em>Abingdon Democrat</em>, October 12, 1860.,
    "How the Union shall be preserved"
  • "Union Electoral Ticket. State of Virginia. The Union, the Constitution, and the Enforcement of the Laws. For president, John Bell, of Tennessee, for vice-president, Edward Everett of Massachusetts," 1860, Broadside, 1860 .U63a BOX, Special Collections, Library of Virginia.,
    Constitutional Union Party ballot 1860
  • "Democratic ticket: Our Principles, the Constitution.... For President John C. Breckinridge, of Kentucky. For Vice President Joseph Lane of Oregon," 1860, Broadside, 1860 .D38 BOX, Special Collections, Library of Virginia.,
    Breckinridge ballot 1860
  • "National Democratic Ticket, for Virginia. For President, Stephen A. Douglas, of Illinois. For Vice-president, Herschel V. Johnson, of Georgia ... : Election, the 6th Day of November, 1860,"  Broadside, Small Special Collections, University of Virginia.,
    Douglas ballot 1860
  • "Virginia Republican ticket. For president Abraham Lincoln of Illinois. For vice president Hannibal Hamlin of Maine," 1860, Broadside, Flavia Reed Owen Special Collections and Archives, Randolph-Macon College.,
    Republican ballot 1860
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« Return to 1860 Presidential Election

Presidential Candidates

At the Democratic National Convention held in Charleston, South Carolina, in April 1860, the party split into two factions that separately reassembled in Baltimore in June and nominated rival candidates for president and vice president. The group often described as the Southern Democrats nominated John C. Breckindridge, a Kentucky native then serving as vice president as its presidential candidate. The group generally referred to as the Northern Democrats nominated Stephen A. Douglas, a United States senator from Illinois as its candidate. The Republican Party nominated Abraham Lincoln, a well-known opponent of slavery, for president. The new Constitutional Union Party nominated a former Whig congressman from Tennessee, John Bell, whose party platform included nothing specific on any issues and merely pledged to preserve the Constitution and the Union.