Virginia Memory, Library of Virginia
THIS PAGE HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING

Union or Secession
  • "A capital fortification"
On July 14, 1861, a man from Mecklenburg Country reported to his local newspaper on the condition of a local company on duty at Jamestown Island.
« Return to Civil War Begins

"A capital fortification"

Unsigned letter to the editor, dated at Clarksville on July 14, 1861, and printed in the Clarksville Tobacco Plant, July 19, 1861.

A man from the southern county of Mecklenburg reported to his local newspaper in mid-July 1861 on the condition of a local company on duty at Jamestown Island. "Messrs. Lincoln, Seward, Scott & Co. have undertaken a bad job, and had as well give it up," he wrote, referring to United States President Abraham Lincoln, Secretary of State William H. Seward, and General Winfield Scott. "They can neither subdue, subjugate, kill or starve us out. We were born free and will never wear the yoke of tyranny and oppression of such base and contemptible men as control the affairs of the Federal government at Washington. All we ask is to be let alone, and he that undertakes to interfere with us, will do it at his peril."

Unsigned letter to the editor, dated at Clarksville on July 14, 1861, and printed in the Clarksville Tobacco Plant, July 19, 1861.