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Union or Secession
  • "The President's infamous Proclamation"
Editor Charles W. Button wrote in his Lynchburg Daily Virginian for May 2, 1861, that President Abraham Lincoln's proclamation calling for militiamen to put down the Southern rebellion had destroyed the last vestige of Unionism in Virginia.
Related Biographies:
  • Charles William Button (1822–1894)
    Charles William Button
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"The President's infamous Proclamation"

Extract from an editorial in the Lynchburg Daily Virginian, May 2, 1861.

Following the surrender of Fort Sumter, in South Carolina, on April 13, 1861, President Abraham Lincoln requested 75,000 militiamen, including 2,340 officers and men from Virginia, to put down the Southern rebellion. Governor John Letcher did not comply with the president's request. Editor Charles William Button wrote in his Lynchburg Daily Virginian for May 2, 1861, that Lincoln's "infamous Proclamation" had breathed "nothing but vengeance, subjugation and war" and had destroyed the last vestige of Unionism in Virginia.

Extract from an editorial in the Lynchburg Daily Virginian, May 2, 1861.

Then followed the President's infamous Proclamation, indicating a purpose to subjugate the Southern States. It was this that did the business in Virginia, not the attack on Fort Sumter. It was this that swept away the last refuge of the Union men of Virginia. They could not maintain their ground in the face of the Proclamation breathing nothing but vengeance, subjugation and war.