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Suggestion for mediation

Union or Secession
  • Suggestion for mediation
In an editorial published on December 22, 1860, the editor of the Lynchburg Daily Virginian, advised the state to take the lead in settling the sectional crisis.
Related Biographies:
  • Charles William Button (1822–1894)
    Charles William Button
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Suggestion for mediation

Extract from an editorial in the Lynchburg Daily Virginian, December 22, 1860.

Two days after South Carolina seceded, Charles William Button, editor of the Lynchburg Daily Virginian, advised the state to take the lead in settling the sectional crisis. Button cited Virginia's historic role in founding the United States and preserving the Union during the Nullification Crisis in the 1830s. In December 1860 he was convinced that "it is quite probable that the voice of Virginia would be heard, and that her counsels would receive that consideration to which they are justly entitled."

Extract from an editorial in the Lynchburg Daily Virginian, December 22, 1860.
A Mediation.
Suggestions have been made in the newspapers, that it would be well for some State holding a conservative position, to undertake the task of tendering a mediation at the present juncture, between the North and the South.
In this connection, Virginia has been named as being eminently entitled to that honor, not only on account of her historic renown, as "the mother of States and statesmen;" but because of her position geographically; her established character for conservatism and loyalty to the Union, and her inflexible devotion to the real interests of the South. It is known that upon a former memorable occasion, Virginia did tender her good offices to allay an irritating quarrel between the federal government a sister State, and that her counsels were regarded; but we doubt exceedingly whether, in the present temper of that same State—now in revolt—the counsels of Virginia would be received. They have been spurned and precluded by that State. As to the other States, it is quite probable that the voice of Virginia would be heard, and that her counsels would receive that consideration to which they are justly entitled. We should be glad, therefore, to see the Legislature of our State, amongst its first acts, appoint one or more of our eminent citizens to confer with our sister States respecting the crisis that is upon us. It could do no harm.