Virginia Memory, Library of Virginia
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What a woman can do for her country

Union or Secession
  • "To do any thing that a woman can do for her country"
  • "To do any thing that a woman can do for her country"
On April 20, 1861, three days after the Virginia Convention voted to secede and even before the news could reach the rural portions of Virginia, Sarah A. Logan, of Goochland County, advised the governor that she and her daughters were prepared to begin production of flannel shirts for soldiers.
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"To do any thing that a woman can do for her country"

Sarah A. Logan to Governor John Letcher, April 20, 1861, Executive Papers of Governor John Letcher, Acc. 36787, State Government Records Collection, Record Group 3, Library of Virginia.

Three days after the Virginia Convention voted to secede and even before the news could reach the rural portions of Virginia, Sarah A. Logan, of Dungeness, in the central Virginia county of Goochland, wrote a letter to the governor. Anxious "to do any thing that a woman can do for her country," she offered the services of herself and daughters to sew flannel shirts for soldiers. "I will make as many as you can send me the materials for,— say five hundred or a thousand. I can do it, as I have a large force at my command; and if necessary we will work night and day." The "large force" at her command likely included some of the more than 50 enslaved laborers at her family's plantation.

Sarah A. Logan to Governor John Letcher, April 20, 1861, Executive Papers of Governor John Letcher, Acc. 36787, State Government Records Collection, Record Group 3, Library of Virginia.

Dungeness
April 20th: 1861.
To Governor Letcher:
Accept my services for my State. I have no son old enough, and my husband is one of the "homeguard" so I wish with the assistance of my daughters to do something—anything. Hearing that red flannel shirts or jackets are needed, I will make as many as you can send me the materials for,— say five hundred or a thousand. I can do it, as I have a large force at my command; and if necessary we will work night and day—. This is not a strange proposal as I reside only thirty nine miles from Richmond and can send the articles at a day's notice. I am desirous—anxious to do any thing that a woman can do for her country.
May God be with you and all others to whom is entrusted the guidance of this commonwealth in its hour of danger, and may He guard and protect those who are about to Struggle for our liberty. God be merciful unto us and keep us—
Yours respectfully
SARAH A LOGAN
of Dungeness
Loch Lomand P.O.
Goochland Co
Virginia
The flannel can be sent to the above address and it will reach me safely