Virginia Memory, Library of Virginia
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Union or Secession
  • "No more licorice"
Richmond merchant Samuel Ayers and Son informed Henry County merchant Benjamin Franklin Gravely on May 18, 1861, on the effects of the naval blockade that President Abraham Lincoln had imposed on the states that seceded.
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"No more licorice"

Samuel Ayres and Son to Benjamin Franklin Gravely, May 18, 1861, Gravely Family Papers, Acc. 34126, Library of Virginia.

The Richmond commission merchant office of Samuel Ayres and Son informed Henry County merchant Benjamin Franklin Gravely on May 18, 1861, of one of the effects of the naval blockade that President Abraham Lincoln had imposed. Lincoln announced on April 19, 1861, a naval blockade of the ports of the states that had seceded from the Union and on April 27 emended it to include Virginia and North Carolina. One consequence Ayers mentioned was that "there will be no more licorice coming here until the end of the War or the raising of the blockade." Licorice was one of the flavoring ingredients that tobacco manufacturers added to their processed tobacco.

Samuel Ayres and Son to Benjamin Franklin Gravely, May 18, 1861, Gravely Family Papers, Acc. 34126, Library of Virginia.

Richmond May 18th 1861
B. F. Gravely Esq
Dear Sir
We have just received your favor of the 14th inst and hasten to reply. The best licorice to had here now is the "Estrada" in half cases. It is now selling at 22 Cash, as all other is, but what it will be when we hear from you, it is impossible to say. It is scarce and has been on the advance for some weeks. Not a case of Sanford here. Nor G. C. nor J. C. & Co.
Very Truly
S Ayres & Son

There will be no more licorice coming here until the end of the War or the raising