Virginia Memory, Library of Virginia
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PAST EXHIBITIONS

Poe: Man, Myth, or Monster? icon

Poe: Man, Myth, or Monster?
(July 20, 2009—December 5, 2009)

Who is Edgar Allan Poe? An instantly recognizable American author and historical figure, his name calls to mind spine-chilling stories and melancholy poetry. He evokes the image of the tragic romantic poet, misunderstood and rejected by society. We are so familiar with his life and work that we already know him. Or do we?

From Williamsburg to Wills's Creek: The Fry-Jefferson Map icon

From Williamsburg to Wills's Creek: The Fry-Jefferson Map
(August 18, 2008—May 30, 2009)

This exhibition focuses on the sources and sequels of the Fry–Jefferson map, created by Joshua Fry and Peter Jefferson in 1755. The exhibition examines the role of surveyors in colonial Virginia, the importance of the surveying experience for Joshua Fry and Peter Jefferson in creating their important map, and the influence of their map on later cartographic representations of Virginia. The published map included Fry and Jefferson's completed border survey for the western bounds of the Northern Neck and the dividing line between Virginia and North Carolina. For the first time the entire Virginia river system was properly delineated, and the northeast-southwest orientation of the Appalachian Mountains was displayed.

Never Built Virginia icon

Never Built Virginia
(January 11, 2008—January 26, 2008)

From Thomas Jefferson's design of the Virginia State Capitol to Northern Virginia's soaring post-modern structures of glass and steel, the commonwealth's architectural triumphs are well-documented. But what of those that never made it beyond the drawing board? Never Built Virginia explored a variety of proposed architectural projects from around the commonwealth that remained unbuilt because the architecture was too radical, because funding collapsed, or because they lost favor with their patrons.

Queen and Commonwealth icon

Queen and Commonwealth
(Online Exhibition)

On October 16, 1957, Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip visited Virginia during the commonwealth's 350th anniversary celebration of the founding of Jamestown. Then, as now, the Queen's visit prompted intense interest from the state's people and the media. To mark the 2007 royal visit, the Library of Virginia presented photographs, audio, newspaper accounts, and state records from the 1957 events.

Myth and Memory: Understanding 400 Years of Virginia History icon

Myth and Memory: Understanding 400 Years of Virginia History
(January 8, 2007—January 15, 2007)

Myth and Memory: Understanding Four Hundred Years of Virginia History examined how Virginians have remembered their past through public events, through writing about history, and through marking history on the landscape. Because Virginians are peculiarly interested in, and contentious about, their past, their historical memory often results in competing interpretations.

Freeing Art From Wood: The Sculpture of Leslie Garland Bolling icon

Freeing Art From Wood: The Sculpture of Leslie Garland Bolling
(July 24, 2006—October 21, 2006)

Through timing, perseverance, and sheer good fortune, Leslie Garland Bolling (1898–1955) captured the attention and imagination of the art public from 1926 to 1943 with more than eighty portrait busts and sculptures of working people and nude figures. He faced obstacles: he was African American, he was self–taught, and he lived in the segregated South. The web exhibition includes descriptions and, where available, illustrations of works discovered after the physical exhibition closed. The catalog, Freeing Art from Wood, is available from the Virginia Shop.

Virginia Library Association: Honoring the Past, Building Our Future; One Hundred Years of the Virginia Library Association icon

Virginia Library Association: Honoring the Past, Building Our Future; One Hundred Years of the Virginia Library Association
(December 4, 2004—March 15, 2005)

Learn more about the Virginia Library Association (VLA) which has developed, promoted, and improved library and information services and the profession of librarianship to advance literacy and learning and to ensure access to information for all Virginians.

Working Out Her Destiny: Women's History in Virginia icon

Working Out Her Destiny: Women's History in Virginia
(August 2, 2004—March 26, 2005)

Working Out Her Destiny: Women's History in Virginia, 1600-2004 took a fresh look at the history of Virginia's women and the history of Virginia in the light of twenty years of innovative scholarship since the 1984-1985 Virginia Women's Cultural History Project presented the first ever exhibition and book on Virginia women's history, "'A Share of Honour,' Virginia Women 1600-1945."

Maps, Charts & Atlases icon

Maps, Charts & Atlases
(March 1, 2004—July 3, 2004)

Maps, Charts & Atlases honored the dedication and devotion of Alan M. Voorhees to the collection, preservation, and study of cartographic materials. An avid collector, Mr. Voorhees donated to the Library of Virginia maps that focus on the exploration of the Chesapeake Bay area and the development of Virginia within the context of both European and American history. The cultural perceptions, political aspirations, and extent of geographical knowledge of those who created these maps and atlases are evident in the lavish cartouches, or title areas, and the illustrations and land claims, many with bright hand-coloring. These maps are available for research use in the Library of Virginia's Nathalie P. Voorhees Map Room.

Brown v. Board of Education: Virginia Responds icon

Brown v. Board of Education: Virginia Responds
(December 29, 2003—July 31, 2004)

Marking the 50th anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling striking down segregation in school, Brown v. Board of Education explored Virginia's reaction to the ruling through the letters and petitions of individual citizens and organizations sent to elected officials and through the adoption of the policy of "Massive Resistance."